How to enjoy winter

How to Enjoy Winter Living

Do you enjoy the winter season? I have to admit that it doesn’t come naturally to me.

The promise of Christmas and the bright lights, decorations and general festivities throughout November and December ride me on a high to the end of the year, but once New Year celebrations are over my mood can easily plummet once the anticlimax sets in. Not to mention that most people are broke so have little money to go out and spend to cheer themselves up, plus everyone seems to be on a diet.

All of this, combined with frosty temperatures and drizzly days here in the UK, don’t exactly make a recipe for joyful living in January and February.

Enough of all that negativity, though! Yes, it may be more difficult to stay upbeat and enjoy the coldest part of the year, but it just takes a little more effort to do so.

Hygge

I’m an afficionado of the Scandinavian concept of ‘hygge’, having been an long-time watcher of Scandi noir TV shows and films (obviously the scenes of hygge are interspersed with solving crimes but there are still plenty of them!). I’ve read a fair few books on the subject, too. I love ‘The Art of Hygge’ by Johnny Jackson and Elias Larsen and ‘The Little Book of Hygge’ by Meik Wiking amongst others. There are too many facets to the hygge concept to detail in this post, so I’ll just mention a couple.

Atmosphere

Create a cosy atmosphere at home. This begins with lighting: the Danes like to create soft pockets of lighting in corners of rooms with lamps rather than switching on ceiling lights that illuminate a room too dazzlingly.

Scandi homes tend to utilise a lot of natural materials such as wood, leather and wool in their decor and these natural textures look good together. Soft throws and blankets are used to stay warm and cosy. All of this helps to create an appealing home that you’ll enjoy spending time in and coming home to.

I feel far more content at home if my surroundings are organised and neat as well as beingΒ clutter free, as I’ve written about before.

Personally, having fresh flowers around is an unbeatable way to bring a little life and cheer into the home. They needn’t be expensive and recently I have been splitting one bunch of flowers in half then arranging into two separate vases to enjoy seeing them in two different rooms.

Presence and Togetherness

Hygge requires that when people come together to spend time with each other, they are fully present in the experience. This means switching off phones and putting them out of sight. Many of us spend far too long on our phones these days, it’s almost habitual to keep checking for messages or Facebook updates but it does little to enhance our connection with real people in the present moment. Take the chance to play card or board games with friends and family, or pull out a guitar or other instrument and have a good old sing song. These traditional activities have a magical way of creating a strong sense of well-being and form memories.

Other than hygge, there are a few other strategies to make the most of winter living.

Plan things to look forward to

Plan a few get-togethers with friends at your home; they cost very little if you plan the types of activities mentioned in the paragraph above and are something to look forward to in the short dark days.

Plan further ahead, too. If you haven’t already booked a summer holiday, this could be the perfect opportunity. Researching where to go and thinking ahead to the summer will lift your spirits no end. I’ve said before that for me, part of the pleasure of holidays etc in in the anticipation leading up to it. Plus, the earlier you book, the longer you have to save up for it as well as enjoy that sense of anticipation. Believe it or not, I actually booked our August 2018 holiday back in November 2016 (out of necessity due to high demand). I’ve certainly eked out the anticipation period for that one!

Enjoy hearty, seasonal foods

Eating seasonally makes sense in many ways: it is cheaper, tastier and reduces food miles. There are a lot of winter vegetables that are filling and full of flavour and can be cooked in many different dishes, such as soups, stews and casseroles. Using different herbs and spices to season them with changes the taste.

I am a huge fan of the slow cooker which can be used to simmer away all day cooking tasty, hearty winter stews and other dishes. What could be better to return home to at the end of the day that the delicious aroma of it all ready to tuck into?

Here is a post about eating healthily in cold weather, too.

I hope this post has given you a few ideas or at least reminders of the enjoyable aspects of winter. Please do add your own in the comments section, I’m always keen to gain more tips πŸ™‚

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4 thoughts on “How to Enjoy Winter Living

  1. I really love this post. I’ve struggled with the winter blues in the past, when I lived up north for a very bleak winter. I wrote about it recently, and I’ve received several emails from readers who share the same experience. I agree with your point to have something to look forward to, even if we have to create it ourselves rather than waiting for it to simply appear. Great post. I hope you’re lighting candles, hosting dinner parties or simply listening to lovely music. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Seasonal foods (I personally love soups and stews) and planning gatherings after the holidays are over are definitely key to keep me going until spring. It gets dark at 4:30 in the middle of winter around here, and I find getting outside during the daylight hours makes a huge difference to my overall mood.

    Liked by 1 person

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